Nutrition

Getting your nutrition right for an event such as the Bowral Classic is imperative. Without giving due consideration to pre-ride nutrition you run the risk hitting the wall prematurely ...

You may not want to drink chocolate milk every day, but as an alternative to retail outlet recovery potions, it might be the miracle elixir! David O'Reilly explains.

One of the key members of any professional cycling outfit is the Team Doctor - nobody in the team carries more responsibility for not only rider health and wellbeing, but the reputation and long-term accountability of all involved.

Low carbohydrate diets have become part of the fad diet landscape, and gained an almost universally negative reputation. However, some cyclists integrate a low carb regime in their training. David O'Reilly looks at how and why.

Performance Nutritionist, David O'Reilly, gives us the good oil on overtraining, and immune system overload.

Winter can sometimes be an excuse for poor eating habits and weight gain. Make your plan now to maintain your ideal weight, or lose those extra kilos. Here's the way to lose 5-10kg over a 6-12 week period without compromising your body composition or performance.

When it comes to nutritional quality, not only does preparing your meals and snacks at home give you much more control over what you are eating but it also means that you have complete control over the amounts of carbs, proteins, vegies and good fats that you consume diet on a daily basis.

There is plenty of attention given to eating for recovery, carb loading and hydration but far less to macronutrient balance. So how much carbohydrate, protein and fat do cyclists of different levels require?

It almost seems unfathomable that a healthy cyclist would be at risk of poor bone health, but recent studies are prompting some to action.

Protein is the buzz word for many an athlete and while thoughts of all things protein instantly turn to protein powders and slabs of steak the truth is that you cannot go past the humble egg.

For many of us, fish equals brain food but for cyclists fish also represents a significant source of lean protein and depending on the type of fish you choose, a great source of nature’s anti-inflammatory omega free fats. So how often do we really need to eat fish to get all the health benefits and what are the best types for us to maximise these benefits?

Preparation is everything when it comes to endurance cycling, particularly from a nutrition perspective. For any ride or event that lasts longer than 90 minutes, starting your ride with optimally fuelled muscles is the simplest thing you can do to perform physically for an extended number of hours.

A stimulant capable of improving perfomance, though not banned by the powers that be, caffeine is addictive and readily available. But how much is too much? 

For many athletes, the word sugar is synonymous with energy – lollies eaten in a feeding frenzy at the end of a long training ride, the banana before an interval session for a quick energy hit.

Arriving home after a long day and heading straight to the fridge to pour a glass of wine or grab a beer is daily habit of many and while there is nothing wrong with enjoying alcohol in moderation, there may be some side effects of excessive alcohol consumption.